Leadership
Needs Assessment
Writing A Business Plan
Reimbursement
Delivery Models
Inter-Disciplinary Team
Program Operations
Quality Assessment






The Importance of Effective Leadership

Collaboration and team building are critical leadership skills for palliative care program success.

Leadership has been defined as "the act of mobilizing and energizing the creative resources of all people to foster success for any group, organization, or community". 1 Strong, effective leadership is critical to the successful development of palliative care programs.2,3 Leadership skills include vision, direction, motivation, empowerment, modeling, coaching, team building, managing change and risk taking.4 The effective program director should be an opinion-leader (meaning that colleagues and co-workers respect and follow his or her model) and should have a high level of clinical competency.

Because palliative care is not a solo practice, strong collaborative and team-building skills are critical for success. Successful leaders have the management and administrative skills necessary to collaborate not only with an interdisciplinary team, but also with the multiple associated programs, community institutions, and leaders and stakeholders whose on-going support and commitment will contribute to the long-term integration and sustainability of a hospital-based palliative care program.

In order to gain diverse perspectives on the problem and potential solutions, the leader may benefit from collaborating with an "early adopter" group that shares the initial stages of program development. Such a group includes representatives from the diverse disciplines needed to deliver palliative care (medicine, nursing, social work), hospital administrators and representatives from the specialties most involved in care of the dying.5,6

Related References

1. Approaching Death: Improving Care at the End of Life. Committee on Care at the End of Life, Institute of Medicine. Washington, DC: National Academy Pr; 1997.

2. Lynn J, Harrell F Jr, Cohn F, Wagner D, Connors AF Jr. Prognosis of seriously ill hospitalized patients on the days before death: Implications for patient care and public policy. New Horiz 1997;5:56-61.

3. Meisel A, Snyder L, Quill T for the American College of Physicians-American Society of Internal Medicine End-of-Life Care Consensus Panel. Seven Legal Barriers to End-of-Life Care: Myths, Realities, and Grains of Truth. JAMA 2000;284:2495.
http://jama.ama-assn.org

4. Orentlicher D, Caplan A. The Pain Relief Promotion Act of 1999: A Serious Threat to Palliative Care. JAMA 2000;283:255.
http://jama.ama-assn.org

5. Phillips DF. End-of-Life Coalitions Grow to Fill Needs. JAMA 2000;284:2442.
http://jama.ama-assn.org

PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine, provides access to over 11 million citations from MEDLINE and additional life science journals. PubMed includes links to many sites providing full text articles and other related resources.  Visit:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=PubMed


Additional Resources

CAPC Marketing Tool: How to Promote Palliative Care at Your Hospital

Palliative Care: A Primer for Institutional Leaders
The first in CAPC's technical assistance series, Diane Meier, MD, Director of the Center to Advance Palliative Care, provides practical information on the design, development and management of hospital-based palliative care services.

Funding through Philanthropy -Grand Rounds
Diane Meier, MD, Director of CAPC and of the Hertzberg Palliative Care Institute at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, talks about how Philanthropy can help to fund Palliative Care programs. The audio is available for download.

Funding Palliative Care Through Philanthropy 1/2
Funding Palliative Care Through Philanthropy
How to Fund Your Palliative Care Program
Module 2 Part 1
June 2002, Seattle, WA
Susan S. Paresky, MBA
PowerPoint Presentation

Funding Palliative Care Through Philanthropy 2/2
How to Fund Your Palliative Care Program
Module 2 Part 2
Asking for Money: One Person's View
June 2002, Seattle, WA
Diane E. Meier, MD, FACP
PowerPoint Presentation

Gift Planning Examples
How to Fund Your Palliative Care Program
Module 2 Part 1
Funding Palliative Care Through Philanthropy
June 2002, Seattle, WA
Susan S. Paresky, MBA
Attachment

Glossary of Fundraising Terms
How to Fund Your Palliative Care Program
Module 2 Part 1
Funding Palliative Care Through Philanthropy
June 2002, Seattle, WA
Susan S. Paresky, MBA
Attachment

Responding to Objections
How to Fund Your Palliative Care Program
Module 2 Part 1
Funding Palliative Care Through Philanthropy
June 2002, Seattle, WA
Susan S. Paresky, MBA
Attachment

Sample Cover Letter for Stewardship Report
How to Fund Your Palliative Care Program
Module 2 Part 1
Funding Palliative Care Through Philanthropy
June 2002, Seattle, WA
Susan S. Paresky, MBA
Attachment

Sample Designation Term Agreement
How to Fund Your Palliative Care Program
Module 2 Part 1
Funding Palliative Care Through Philanthropy
June 2002, Seattle, WA
Susan S. Paresky, MBA
Attachment

Sample Event Fundraising Letter 1
How to Fund Your Palliative Care Program
Module 2 Part 1
Funding Palliative Care Through Philanthropy
June 2002, Seattle, WA
Susan S. Paresky, MBA
Attachment

Sample Event Fundraising Letter 2
How to Fund Your Palliative Care Program
Module 2 Part 1
Funding Palliative Care Through Philanthropy
June 2002, Seattle, WA
Susan S. Paresky, MBA
Attachment

Sample Organizational Chart-Development Office
How to Fund Your Palliative Care Program
Module 2 Part 1
Funding Palliative Care Through Philanthropy
June 2002, Seattle, WA
Susan S. Paresky, MBA
Attachment

Physician's Survey: a Needs Assessment Tool to Build Support
This downloadable survey is designed for leadership to distribute within their institution. It can be used as a marketing tool to help assess attitudes, educate colleagues, solicit input and build a strong case for creating a palliative care program.

Palliative Care in Hospitals: Making the Case
A CAPC Management Training Seminar
February, 2002 Tampa, FL
PowerPoint Presentation

Defining Objectives (session 1 worksheet 1)
From a list of Possible Palliative Care Program Objectives, the user of this worksheet will be able to rank their objectives and that of their institution.

Identifying Stakeholders (session 1 worksheet 2)
Creating an array that broadly identifies people who may be stakeholders is an important step in developing a program design, an approval strategy, and an implementation strategy. The above sheets focus on a “first cut” to help identify players.

Drafting your “dream teams” (session 1 worksheet 3)
Planning for Structure: Committees and Workgroups. This 3 page form builds upon the Identifying Stakeholders worksheet by asking the user to identify appropriate people for a Steering Committee, a Design Workgroup and a Proposed Team.

Identifying Organizational Priorities (session 2 worksheet 1)
a 1 page form to rank a Hospital's objectives.

Positioning Palliative Care to meet Organizational Needs (session 2 worksheet 2)
a 1 page form which builds upon the topical areas of worksheet 1 by looking at a palliative care program's potential contributions.

Bridging Clinical and Business Objectives (session 2 worksheet 3)
a 2 page form that builds upon worksheet 2 by asking a series of questions about organizational initiatives, program contributions and financial impact.

Summary Program Assessment (Session 3)
Summary questionaire to assess the goals, scale, needs, type, obstacles, measurements of success, Roles and Responsibilities of a palliative care program.

Common Misperceptions about Hospice
This list was provided courtesy of the Hospice and Palliative Care Association of NY State.

Education and Training as Catalysts to Forming a Palliative Care Service
A CAPC Fall Forum 2001 Workshop
October 2001, Chicago, IL
PowerPoint Presentation

Promoting Excellence in End-of-Life Care (PEELC): Expanding the Realm of the Possible
A CAPC Fall Forum 2001 Workshop
October 2001, Chicago, IL
PowerPoint Presentation

Leadership -Grand Rounds
Diane Meier, MD, director of CAPC, discusses how to establish an effective leadership process

Palliative Care Fall Forum 2000
Proceedings Summary

Last Acts Diversity and End-of-Life Care Literature Review
Annotated Bibliography

CAPC State Palliative Care Networks

Learning to Die in the 21st Century
In the Winter 2001 edition of Supportive Voice, Last Acts Partners Christine K. Cassel, MD, and Diane E. Meier, MD, write about the need to relearn about the dying process.

Principles for Care of Patients at the End of Life: An Emerging Consensus among the Specialties of Medicine

Making Promises: A Vision of a Better System
Americans for Better Care of the Dying

Making the Case for a Palliative Care Program
Gathering Supportive Data
A CAPC Fall Forum 2000 Workshop
Audio Presentation

End-of-Life Care Legislation
Brief Summary


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